All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal

Commentary - (2023) Volume 12, Issue 2

Ring and Bring Drug Services

Geoffrey Hunt*
*Correspondence: Geoffrey Hunt, Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia, Email:
Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia

Received: 02-Feb-2023, Manuscript No. IJDRT-23-94954; Editor assigned: 04-Feb-2023, Pre QC No. P-94954; Reviewed: 16-Feb-2023, QC No. Q-94954; Revised: 21-Feb-2023, Manuscript No. R-94954; Published: 28-Feb-2023, DOI: 10.37421/2277-1506.2023.12.395

Description

Nowadays, illegal drug dealers compete with each other not only for customers but also for convenience and speed of delivery. This article researches ring and bring drug managing and contends that an emphasis on vendors utilization of cell phones is helpful for investigating ebb and flow changes inside retail level medication markets. The article is based on 21 in-depth face-to-face interviews with active drug dealers in Denmark who were all involved in the delivery of drugs, mostly cocaine and cannabis, frequently to buyers residences. The dealers in this study displayed a technological conservatism, in contrast to previous research that has highlighted how enthusiastically drug dealers frequently adopt new communication technologies. Additionally, mobile phones have become essential to the construction of dealer in-group hierarchies and have made retail drug sales more adaptable, individualized and comparable to other consumer services [1].

Lastly, the growing popularity of mobile phones has made it possible to trade and sell drug customer portfolios on SIM cards alongside other commodities in the drug economy. We demonstrate how a social constructivist perspective on technology can offer a more in-depth and nuanced account of the sociotechnical ensemble and the meaning-making processes that shape retail delivery dealing. Nowadays, illegal drug dealers compete with each other not only for customers but also for convenience and speed of delivery. This article looks into ring and bring drug dealing and argues that focusing on dealers use of mobile phones is useful for looking into the current changes in retail drug markets. The article depends on 21 eye to eye top to bottom meetings with dynamic street pharmacists in Denmark every one of whom were associated with the conveyance of medications (chiefly marijuana and cocaine) frequently to purchasers homes. The dealers in this study displayed a technological conservatism, in contrast to previous research that has highlighted how enthusiastically drug dealers frequently adopt new communication technologies [2].

Additionally, mobile phones have become essential to the construction of dealer in-group hierarchies and have made retail drug sales more adaptable, individualized and comparable to other consumer services. Lastly, the growing popularity of mobile phones has made it possible to trade and sell drug customer portfolios on SIM cards alongside other commodities in the drug economy. We demonstrate how a social constructivist perspective on technology can offer a more in-depth and nuanced account of the socio-technical ensemble and the meaning-making processes that shape retail delivery dealing. An instrumentalist approach is the first and most common strategy. Mobile phones are portrayed as relatively neutral tools that are ready to serve their users needs from this perspective. For instance, research has portrayed mobile phones as drug dealing facilitators, describing them as a working tool, a marketing medium, an essential tool, equipment, or master tool [3,4].

More specifically, researchers have focused on how dealers use smartphone encryption apps to brand their products and how they use phones to organize supply logistics, reduce the visibility of their illegal activities, establish local warning systems and build a stable customer base. Even though the aforementioned studies provide important accounts of how dealers use of mobile phones is influenced by their perceptions of risk and safety, the majority of these studies analyse dealers as isolated, rational actors who use phones to achieve strategic benefits like higher profits and lower risks. Even though dealers use mobile phones as tools, a narrow instrumentalist focus can lead researchers to produce descriptions of dealers mobile phone use patterns and the strategic benefits (or risks) of adopting a particular technology that are decontextualized. The subsequent methodology is to see innovation as a power of (revolutionary) change. Technology and society are viewed as somewhat distinct from one another from this point of view and technological advancements are primarily portrayed as an external force that alters drug dealing practices. Media accounts particularly emphasize this point of view. This quote comes from a recent BBC documentary that says that apps for social media are changing the way young people buy and sell drugs [5].

New technologies don't just act on their own and influence practice; neither do actors just use them when they want to. Instead, the utilization of technologies like mobile phones is incorporated into practices that are already in place and is positioned within particular social and cultural contexts. To move beyond conventional instrumental perspectives on the role of mobile phones in drug dealing, we argued in this article that a social constructivist approach to technology is useful. The advantage of a social constructivist approach is that it focuses our attention on how the use and capabilities of mobile phones are the result of social network processes, even though dealers do use mobile phones to achieve strategic benefits like increasing profits and lowering risk. We are also able to provide more nuanced accounts of how dealers' use of mobile phones interacts with cultural meaning-making processes thanks to a social constructivist perspective.

Acknowledgement

None.

Conflict of Interest

No potential conflict of interest was reported by the authors.

References

  1. Lee, Won-Bum, Caifeng Wang, Jung-Han Lee and Ki-Jae Jeong, et al. "Whitlockite granules on bone regeneration in defect of rat calvaria." ACS Appl Bio Mater 3 (2020): 7762-7768.
  2. Google Scholar, Crossref, Indexed at

  3. Lin, Hui Xian Jaime, Sanda Cho, Veeraraghavan Meyyur Aravamudan and Hnin Yu Sanda, et al. "Remdesivir in Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) treatment: A review of evidence." Infection 49 (2021): 401-410.
  4. Google Scholar, Crossref, Indexed at

  5. Li, Yingjun, Liu Cao, Ge Li and Feng Cong, et al. "Remdesivir metabolite GS-441524 effectively inhibits SARS-CoV-2 infection in mouse models." J Med Chem 65 (2021): 2785-2793.
  6. Google Scholar, Crossref, Indexed at

  7. Ruggieri, Lucia, Donato Bonifazi, Annalisa Landi and Fedele Bonifazi, et al. "Survey by TEDDY European network of excellence for Paediatric clinical research demonstrates potential for Europe‐wide trials." Acta Paediatr 109 (2020): 607-612.
  8. Google Scholar, Crossref, Indexed at 

  9. Vassal, Gilles, Raphaël Rousseau, Patricia Blanc and Lucas Moreno, et al. "Creating a unique, multi-stakeholder Paediatric Oncology Platform to improve drug development for children and adolescents with cancer." Eur J Cancer 51 (2015): 218-224.
  10. Google Scholar, Crossref